Caistor 2010!

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http://caistordig2010.wordpress.com/

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Day 26 and 27

Welcome blog watchers to what will be the final instalment of the 2009 dig diary. Such was the excitement of finishing and packing up that the writing of the blog got sadly delayed, so this last episode will attempt to be a bumper finale with pictures and all sorts.

Day 26 was the last official day of excavation. We were deluged with visitors with the final count standing at more than 3,600 over the course of the project. The church trenchers continue to dig furiously to finalised the exciting complex of late Roman gullies that have been revealed. The church trench has been a good result with the dominance of late Roman features and finds suggesting that this area of the town may have been sparsely occupied in the early Roman period. Which we didn’t know before. Alice of the mystic pottery skills is excited to find a stamped mortarium of a prolific Colchester mortaria maker (mortaria are big mortar things as in mortar and pestle with gritty interiors to aid the grinding process). John P. is so thrilled by this that he trumps his old lady incarceration feat of the previous day by falling spectacularly into the trench, an act from which he emerges miraculously unscathed. John P’s life continues to unravel on the following day, when he puts his watch in the washing machine and his saucepan rack falls off his kitchen wall.

Ian cleans up the mess left by John P's dramatic trench dive

Ian cleans up the mess left by John P's dramatic trench dive

In Giles and Mick’s wacky world of gravel in trench 1, we are faced with a surfeit of visiting geologists who broadly confirm that we are looking at a complex sequence of periglacial features, in which gravel banks were formed by summer glacial melt waters. A later hollow was probably used by Mesolithic flint knappers (or hopefully it was, otherwise we will have 3 dimensionally recorded a million fint flakes to no purpose whatsoever). Although less spectacular than the weird ritual world of trench 2, trench 1 has contributed a huge amount to our understanding of the formation processes of the Caistor landscape and its use in prehistory. And it did have Boudica’s small gulley.

In trench 2, Francesca, the human bone lady (which sounds like an excellent circus act) causes consternation by announcing that Elvis, a deeply buried body in the lovely pit, is in fact female and so has to be renamed Priscilla. She causes considerably more consternation by saying that we need to lift the exposed sections rather than rebury them, as they are likely to decompose if left. However, star that she is, she volunteers to do the job herself, disappearing into the pit to clean the bones. This later causes the director to GET DIRTY for the first time in the whole season, by lying face down to take pictures of the exposed legs (which sounds worse than it really was).

The director. With the eye of faith some dirt can be glimpsed.

The director. With the eye of faith some dirt can be glimpsed.

On day 27 the last recording jobs are continues and the marquee is sadly taken down (a process not without comedy value). Materials are transported back to the barn, while the supervisors frantically record. The first church trench is backfilled (and remarkably all the material goes back in the hole) while the terram is cut to protect the features in trench 2 prior to backfilling.
Can we do a sailor's hat? Or maybe a lovely swan?

Can we do a sailor's hat? Or maybe a lovely swan?

 

Hazel wrestles the marquee to the ground

Hazel wrestles the marquee to the ground

Thanks to all those who have followed our progress on the blog and who have visited the site to encourage us and buy plastic swords. We were all stunned by the level of interest and support that was shown to us.

The project wouldn’t have happened without the support and encouragement of Peter Wade-Martins and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust, together with David Gurney of Norfolk Landscape Archaeology and John Davies of Norwich Castle Museum.

We owe an enormous debt to May Gurney and their chief executive, Philip Fellowes-Prynne, who not only provided equipment but brought cake as well! Mike Dixon of A-Plant was also a star, responding positively to ever more cheeky requests for equipment. The project was funded by the Foyle Foundation, the Roman Research Trust and South Norfolk Council. Mikey Bentley of South Norfolk Council, a long-standing supporter of the project, was always willing to provide whatever help was requested.

Chris Skinner of High Ash Farm provided the centrepiece of our visitor display with his wonderful collection of stone axes. Thanks too to Caistor Hall Hotel and the Framingham Earl leisure centre for the vital use of their showers.

Giles Emery, Mick Boyle, Sarah Bates, Jon Cousins, John Percival and Heather Wallis were a star supervisory team, while Dave Bescoby surveyed, shared blog responsibility, argued with geologists and withstood the testing of his geophysics. The finds expertise of Alice Lyons, Francesca Boghi, Gwladys Monteil, Sarah Percival and Peter Robins was also fundamental to the success of the dig, providing the facts to counteract the director’s deranged imagination.

Finally, the success of the project owes everything to the hard work and good humour of the many volunteers who made it work, in particular Hazel and Dave Leese, who were the first to arrive on site in August and who will be the last to leave tomorrow (they hope).

Final sword count: 25

Final slow-worm count: 2

In an excavation marked by great cake, this one stands out.

In an excavation marked by great cake, this one stands out.

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Day 24

It’s Thursday and the end of the dig is nigh. Trench 2 is so exciting that we may have to mothball it and come back to it next year. At the very least there is a substantial lovely pit that needs bottoming, which suspiciously seems to be cut into stuff that looked like natural but turned out not to be. There’s always something that you don’t finish, but in this case it probably needs to be revisited.

Big event of the day is John P. locking an old lady in the church at lunch time. Luckily she has a mobile phone and so is able to summon help. She takes her incarceration remarkably well, although in any case, as John points out, there was a plentiful supply of tea and ginger biscuits to sustain her through the days that followed, although as the weeks passed there might have been an issue with scurvy.

The church trench continues to be quite rocking, with more of our exciting late Roman gulley appearing. There is also an exciting cluster of 4 stones and, as all archaeologists know, you only need 3 stones to make a wall. It disappears intriguingly into the section, so hopefully we can find some more stones if the toilet scheme goes ahead and we have to expand the trench.

Giles is on a solo mission in trench 1, and claims to have worked out the geology. He probably has, seeing as we’re getting close to the end, as by default in archaeology the last thought you have is the definitive truth.

Mike Dixon from A Plant pays a visit. Not only does he supply heavy plant and tools, but he also brings biscuits. What a top man. It’s a big day for visitors. Andrew Rogerson from NLA puts in an appearance, and is non-committal on our geology. It’s been a big week for trips from NLA, with the HER and NMP teams coming out on a jolly (sorry, site liaison visit), meaning that we can have a sentence loaded with acronyms.

An old lady, a bit like the one locked in the church by John P.

An old lady, a bit like the one locked in the church by John P.

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Day 23

After our media frenzy, we are deluged with visitors. It is a matter of great regret that we have run out of plastic swords to sell them. All want to see the famous Caistor mystery man but sadly he has been spirited away to an undisclosed location. We have the pictures of his starring moment in the EDP so that has to do. More than 300 visitors come and the director is interviewed by a very attractive lady from Radio 4, thereby demonstrating that archaeology does have some minor perks.

Sue Harman considerably ups the ante on the cake front by creating a spectacular Caistor 2009 cake, complete with Lego centurion (see below). This is demolished by the eager diggers at lunchtime, just before the cherry picker comes, courtesy of May Gurney and the splendid Mike Dixon of A Plant. The director is hoisted skywards and instantly turns into Cecil B. De Mille, arranging his staff as if they were extras in a biblical epic. It’s a great view and the guy driving the cherry picker is helpfulness personified, cheered by the fact that he gets to see skeletons from 30 feet up rather than fixing street lights.

Trench 2 in all its aerial glory.

Trench 2 in all its aerial glory.

Onwards and upwards...

Onwards and upwards...

On the archaeology front, the cremation in trench 1 gets lifted. It seems to have been in a wooden box, or at least there are a lot of nails involved. In the church trench meanwhile, the world of ancient Rome is conclusively reached, as is the natural sand, which is always something of a relief. At the bottom of a little gulley is a splendid coin of Constantine (Urbs Roma with Romulus and Remus suckling at the wolf, which is about as Roman as it gets).

Giles carefully lifts the cremation urn.

Giles carefully lifts the cremation urn.

Highlight of the day though, is James (age 4) visiting the site in full home-made armour as his special treat and bringing us his finds. Archaeology doesn’t get much better than that.

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Day 22

We awake into a media storm. Our strange body has excited the interest of the world’s press. At 7.20 the director in his new role as “baffled expert” (copyright all newspapers) is forced to knock back his cornflakes and mumble about “individuals on the margins of society” for Radio Norfolk. “Baffled expert” also makes it onto page 3 of the EDP and gets on the telly scratching his chin on a continuous loop on BBC Look East. David Gurney (County Archaeologist) gets in some televised chin scratching as well and a good time is had by all.

Rhianne is filmed digging in extreme close-up thereby shaming her children who find it “sooo embarrassing”, and the day ends with an appearance on Radio 4. The plan is now to get more coverage by changing “experts baffled by Caistor mystery man” to “experts solve mystery of Caistor man”. We just need to work on the solving aspect.

Anyway, onto more important things like archaeology. Trench 1 finds a cremation burial (now lifted) cut into the periglacial silt/gravel that has been the cause of so much joy and enthusiasm among the trench 1 diggers. They crowd around the cremation like 7 year olds playing football, with all attempts at defensive formations lost in a mad chase for the ball. And after 3 weeks scraping natural gravel who can blame them?

Only white T-shirts left now. And we’ve run out of John Davies’ Boudica book. We send out an emergency call to John, hoping that he will supply more product to sell to a discerning public. Otherwise, we’ll be down to the replica coins.

Slow-worm now back in hiding.

Dave G in the eye of media storm.

Dave G in the eye of media storm.

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Day 21

Monday, and the trench 2 crew continue to work on their strange features. They complete the removal of the strange burial which we have been trying not to talk about for the last week. This has been quite difficult as it has been the major excitement on site, and not discussing it has been quite hard, forcing us to fill space with thrilling tales of cake and slow-worms. The burial is a particularly odd example, with a man(?) lying on his side in a shallow pit. He has been slightly folded in order to get him in and his right foot is likely to have been just below the surface. The spine seems to be malformed and the manner of interment suggests an individual on the margins of society to whom the normal rules of burial didn’t apply. Early days yet so we have to look for signs of cause of death or trauma once he is clean.

The director obviously sees this as an opportunity to shamelessly court media attention, such is his disappointment at Anglia editing him out of their footage, presumably because he was waffling or his chin scratching didn’t come up to standard. Tomorrow there will be a media onslaught based around the mysterious Caistor body, but today the normal business of work continues.

Mike Salter, an early supporter of the project, pays us a visit. Mike responded to the director’s shameless plea for funds in the pages of the Times, and paid for a huge swathe of the geophysical survey thus paving the way for this season’s excavation. So the very existence of this season and this blog is partly down to Mike.

The Rev Rosie Bunn and husband Tim return from holiday in Turkey, which is a bit of a surprise as they told us they were going to Cornwall. They are pleased with the church trench, particularly the upper bit involving 90 cm of 19th-century tile rubble which is potentially good news for the kitchen and toilet extension to the church. The church trench has also produced remains that potentially predate the church, although as is always the case they are just that little bit ambiguous. To really answer the question about the origins of the church, we need to demolish the existing building, although we could compromise and just dig up the nave floor. We’ll talk to Rosie.

Sales push has switched to T-shirts now. Not many left so don’t be shy.

Caistor Man.

Caistor Man.

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Day 20

Sunday. Day 20 of the excavation. The wind has moved to the north and is howling through the marquee and chilling the diggers who had been scorched by the sun the previous day. But are we downhearted? No, because today is the day that the last two plastic swords are sold. If anyone now wants a high quality reproduction plastic gladius, they will have to wait until next year or go onto Amazon.

As if that weren’t enough excitement, the church trench have a second slow-worm sighting. This time we have photographic evidence, negating the value of the high quality artist’s impression that was included on a previous post. This time it is the daddy of all slow-worms, lounging luxuriantly on the path looking for all the world as if it wasn’t an endangered species.

Über slow-worm, lurking casually in the churchyard.

Über slow-worm, lurking casually in the churchyard.

Despite the weather it is our biggest day yet for visitors with 345 people entering the marquee, bringing the total to more than 2100 for the first 2 weeks of the excavation. Too bad we had just run out of plastic swords. The MG Owners Club came and they would have definitely all wanted one.

On the archaeology front, the Roman blob in the church trench appears to be expanding and it is clear that we are now partly down to Roman levels in the area of the soakaway. Gwladys Monteil, Nottingham’s resident Samian guru, stops in to see if we’ve got some shiny red pottery for her to have a look at. Not only does she identify our Samian, but she brings us chocolate muffins. This is what you want from a finds specialist. Carole and Neville also come up trumps on the cake front, while Hazel brings doughnuts so the day turns into a cakeathon.

Jenny gives her all on the sieving machine.

Jenny gives her all on the sieving machine.

In trench 2 the gullies that showed up on the geophysics do actually seem to exist – surely a first time that excavation has reflected a geophysical survey. The mysterious pits, however, seem to be going down and down. Sarah B has taken to sheltering in the bottom of one of them.

At lunchtime Heather J. gets the call to go to Seething airfield to meet Roman Abramovich and give him a cup of tea (as one does). This could have been the funding opportunity that we were waiting for, but Heather gets replaced at the last moment. Never mind. There’s always the cake. But Roman, if you’re reading this, we’re better value than Didier Drogba. Or at least cheaper.

Boudica: Is she responsible for this small Iron Age gulley (below)?

Boudica: Is she responsible for this small Iron Age gulley (below)?

Boudica's small gulley.

Boudica's small gulley.

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